FAQs


Frequently Asked Questions from Parents

How will I know if my child is ready to go to camp?
How are campers assigned to cabins?
Do campers travel out of camp for trips?
Is there a different schedule on Shabbat?
What kind of food do you serve?
What facilities do you have for health care?
How do we communicate with our child during the season?
What do campers wear at camp?
I am excited about your camp. Do you offer tours?
Camp JORI sounds just right for my child. What is the application procedure?
Can I email the Camp Director directly?

Frequently Asked Questions from Campers

I am going to camp with my sister or brother. Can I see them during the day?
Where will I live at camp?
What will I do throughout the day?
Do I go to my activities with my cabin-mates?
Do I sit with my cabin for meals?
Will there be food I like to eat at camp?
Do we swim every day?

 

How will I know if my child is ready to go to camp?
Each child is different when it comes to being “ready” for camp.  Our youngest campers are entering second grade in the fall after their first summer at camp.  Questions to consider include: Is s/he looking forward to camp?  Are they successful at sleepovers with their friends?  The senior staff of Camp, will be happy to speak with you about these and other issues to make the best decision for your child and you.


How are campers assigned to cabins?

Campers are placed in their cabins based on the grade they are entering in the upcoming school year.  Each cabin has 3 counselors and 10-13 campers.


Do campers travel out of camp for trips?
Leader-in-Training (LIT) campers are the only JORI campers who regularly leave camp for field trips. LIT’s have weekly field trips as part of their program.  Younger campers may leave camp on an occasional basis for a special cabin treat or in the case of multiple rainy days in a row.


Is there a different schedule on Shabbat?
Our campers look forward to the weekly celebration of Shabbat.  On Friday afternoon, campers have two periods rather than the normal three.  Showers, music preparations, blue and white clothing and specially set tables take a bit of extra time.  The entire camp participates in a traditional Friday evening meal followed by services.  After dinner, the entire camp community dances together and enjoys a special treat prepared by our chef.  On Saturday morning, JORI campers sleep late, eat breakfast with their cabins and are served by their counselors.  Saturday afternoons are devoted to camp-wide special events.  Shabbat ends with Havdalah followed by evening activity.


What kind of food do you serve?
We maintain a Kosher kitchen operated by a professional chef.  Our carefully prepared menus are “kid-friendly” and vary.  There is always something healthy and delicious to eat.

Breakfast always includes cold cereal and an entrée such as pancakes, eggs, or French toast. There is also a breakfast bar that includes yogurt, fruit and granola.  Lunch and dinner entrees include various chicken and beef dishes, and dairy meals like grilled cheese and pizza.  At breakfast and dairy meals fat free, lactaid and soy milk are available.

At lunch and dinner we have a salad bar that provides a choice for campers who are looking for an alternative to the meal’s main course.  We also have peanut butter and jelly available.  If there is a meat meal, there will be a vegetarian option.  Special dietary needs or restrictions can be accommodated and should be should be communicated to the senior staff prior to camp.

Campers are served two snacks daily.


What facilities do you have for health care?
Camp JORI employs a full-time nurse who lives at camp and handles all health care issues for campers and staff throughout the summer.  The nurse is assisted by a health assistant who is a certified medical assistant.  Health care includes a daily Health Call and dispensing of daily medications.  We have physicians on call only a short drive away.  In case of emergency, we use South County Hospital in Wakefield, RI.  Should your child spend time in the Health Center overnight or require medical attention from a physician, you will be notified.


How do we communicate with our child during the season?
Campers are required to write a letter home at least twice each week.  Campers receive mail from parents, relatives and friends daily.  You can write emails to your child via your CampInTouch account.

An important part of the camp experience is developing a sense of independence.  Our experience has shown that phone calls to campers can be upsetting to the child.  Please do not call camp and ask to speak with your child.  You are welcome to phone camp to check on your child’s camp experience.  Camp photos will be posted daily and can be accessed via your CampInTouch account.


What do campers wear at camp?
Campers wear comfortable, casual clothes to participate in daily activities.  Our footwear policy requires that campers and staff wear sneakers and socks daily.  Water shoes or water sandals with back straps are required for waterfront activities.  As part of our Shabbat environment, on Friday evening campers wear blue and white clothing.  A nice, but not elaborate, outfit should be packed for each end of session banquet.


I am excited about your camp. Do you offer tours?
We look forward to having your family visit camp this summer with your son or daughter.  Please schedule a tour while camp is in session. Call the winter office (401-421-4111 x.124) until June 21 to make a tour reservation or after that date call the camp office directly (401-783-7000).


C
amp JORI sounds just right for my child. What is the application procedure?
Registration opens on September 15th.  We encourage families to register as soon as possible to ensure space in your preferred session.  First time camper?  Incentive grants are available at onehappycamper.org. We offer financial aid on a rolling basis.  Please call Paul Segal at 401-245-1857.


Can I email the Camp Director directly?
Yes, please email info@campjori.com.

I am going to camp with my sister or brother. Can I see them during the day?

Yes, that’s what is terrific about our camp. We are set up to encourage community and interaction among all age groups. We also eat all meals as an entire camp community, so it is likely you will see each other at meals, too. JORI campers are generally together at evening activities and all snack times


Where will I live at camp?
You will live in one of our cabins with other campers in your grade. Your cabin has electricity, showers, toilets, and sinks. You also have cubbies and a single bed (not a bunk bed). There is space for you to bring a set of plastic drawers if you want to.


What will I do throughout the day?
Your day starts with flag raising and breakfast. You have three activity periods before lunch, then a rest period and three activity periods in the afternoon. After flag lowering and dinner, you enjoy a free play time and then an evening activity.


Do I go to my activities with my cabin-mates?
Campers will walk together to each activity accompanied by a counselor. Some activities are scheduled for your cabin and 1 or 2 daily are interest periods which are activities that you may choose. Interest periods may be with some of your cabin mates, but also include other campers.  You will walk to interest activities with the other campers in the group and with the counselors leading the activity.


Do I sit with my cabin for meals?

The first day of each session you will sit with your cabin. However, for the rest of the summer we arrange the tables with similarly aged children and counselors at both ends of the table and in the middle. Meals are served family-style by the table counselors.


Will there be food I like to eat at camp?
In addition to a breakfast that includes cereal and could include everything from pancakes to eggs, there are popular entrees at lunch and dinner such as pizza, grilled cheese, tacos, chicken dishes, and a great salad bar twice daily.


Do we swim every day?
JORI campers swim every day. Campers have 2-3 lessons each week, but do have a general swim each day. Swimming activities include water aerobics, water polo, water volleyball, and the opportunity to join the Camp JORI swim team which competes with other camps throughout the summer.